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The Breakthroughs in Learning Blog

Time to Act – Learning Disabilities Don’t Just Disappear, the impact continues.

Posted by Matthew Turton on Tue, Dec 04, 2012 @ 01:59 PM

Is your child stressed, and do you know why?

December is a time filled with report cards and progress checks, teacher meetings and more. Holiday time is the perfect time to find out why your child has been struggling in school. The stress of the back to school season is over but your child’s challenges are not? There are some easy action steps you can take.

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Topics: learning disabilities, Reading, memory, behaviour

How hard can it be? Autism and Sensory Overload

Posted by Matthew Turton on Thu, Nov 22, 2012 @ 03:45 PM

A parent once asked me “How hard can it be? I mean really, a little extra help and they should be fine.”

The short answer? Very hard. One of my favorite speeches is a workshop I do called “How Hard Can It Be?” where I put parents and teachers into situations where they can experience just a shimmer of what it’s like to have a learning disability. Tears often prevail, both theirs and mine. As someone who grew up with three learning disabilities myself, I am all too familiar with the pain they cause.

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Topics: learning disabilities, parenting, behaviour, autism

From a therapists desk: Re-motivating & Re-Focusing on the Goal

Posted by Krystal Hundt on Thu, Nov 15, 2012 @ 02:45 PM

Has your child or student ever been ready to just give up? Today was one of those days…

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Topics: learning disabilities, parenting, expectations, love learning, goal setting

"I can't remember conversations" Auditory Memory (pt 2)

Posted by Matthew Turton on Thu, Nov 01, 2012 @ 02:45 PM

This is the third in a series of blogs about six different areas of Memory.

Recently I kicked off a series of articles looking at six different types of memory and how they work. From elementary students to adults, many suffer from memory weaknesses without realizing it. Breakthroughs assesses six different types of memory and this article is the third in a series of blogs about each type, and how they affect our lives. First we looked at two types of visual memory, last week we introduced two types of auditory memory. I highly recommend you read last week’s blog introducing Auditory Memory as today is based on the information discussed there.

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Topics: learning disabilities, client stories, memory, auditory memory

From a Therapist's Desk: A Dramatic Improvement, Listening Skills & More

Posted by Krystal Hundt on Thu, Oct 11, 2012 @ 02:55 PM


Today was one of those days that makes you want to put a sticker on the calendar, the day you want to write home about, the day you want to share with everyone...

So I am sharing it with you.

I truly believe the work I do at Breakthroughs impacts the destiny of each client that sits across the desk from me. It is a joy to watch each student get their breakthrough in learning and each adult find a breakthrough in their search for a career. My favorite days are the ones where the client’s growth is verified through the free retesting we do. In our weekly sessions we work on jumpy eyes, forgetful memory, listening challenges and much more. The goal is to turn these struggles into abilities or strengths.

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Topics: learning disabilities, client stories

"My kid's just lazy!" and Other Behavioural Myths

Posted by Matthew Turton on Thu, Sep 27, 2012 @ 11:50 AM

“Parents [or teachers] of a child with a memory for information deficit are often convinced the child is irresponsible, lazy or stubborn..."  (Barbara Arrowsmith-Young)

We all respond and make decisions from belief systems often operating at the unconscious level. We look at situations in life through our belief systems, just like a pair of sunglasses. When we stop to examine the implications of this, it can be almost frightening. Where have I made assumptions or judgment calls unconsciously which have then clouded my future interactions with others? If we only look at behaviours, it’s easy to label a child with laziness, acting out, ignoring, bullying, fidgeting and distractibility as character traits. These labels do us and the child a great disservice by keeping us focused on the symptoms instead of looking for the root causes.

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Topics: learning disabilities, parenting, expectations, love learning, classroom strategies, teachers

Learning Disabilities Necessitate Flexabilities!

Posted by Matthew Turton on Thu, Sep 20, 2012 @ 02:00 PM

You won't find the word "flexabilities" in the dictionary, but if you parent or teach children with learning disabilities, you likely find it in your life, every day.

Today started out like any other day. I arrived at the office thirty minutes early. In the silence of an empty office, I prepared to meet a young boy (we’ll call him Nick) that I would be assessing. I laid out all my testing materials and paperwork and looked around. Satisfied with my preparations, I started on the mountain of paperwork that seemed to regenerate whenever I slept. 

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Topics: learning disabilities, parenting, expectations, classroom strategies, goal setting

Eye Tracking, “Jumpy Eyes” & Reading Disabilities

Posted by Matthew Turton on Thu, Sep 13, 2012 @ 12:26 PM

I think reading was perhaps one of the most liberating experiences of my childhood so I am troubled by how many children struggle with reading.

A recent survey by Canadian Living Magazine (May 2012) of Ontario’s grade 6 students revealed that ½ of them don’t like to read. Reading was always an area of strength for me, but I have worked with many children who struggle with reading for a wide variety of reasons. I believe that if you are good at something, then in most cases you will enjoy it. For 50% of grade 6 students to not enjoy reading there is something seriously wrong.

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Topics: learning disabilities, Reading, love learning, classroom strategies, reading disability, free download

From a Therapist's Desk: Back to School Learning Goals

Posted by Krystal Hundt on Fri, Sep 07, 2012 @ 02:56 PM

I sent my daughters off to their first day of school this week, what a wide array of emotions I experienced! I was excited, nervous, proud, unsure, confident and nostalgic too.

Do you remember your first day of school? My senses were overwhelmed with the feeling of new shoes and the weight of a back pack on my shoulders, the smell of the classroom, new books and paper, the bright colours of the new clothes. I can remember the nervous butterflies in my belly wanting so desperately to do well this year. Not just "Krystal well" but you know the recognized, "you did so well your classmates will think you are one of the smart ones" well. I remember the desire to fit in to the crowd, to feel like I mattered and to make a positive impact in the lives of those around me. 

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Topics: learning disabilities, parenting, Reading, expectations, love learning, family activity, goal setting

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